The intelligent reader will judge for himself. Without examining the facts fully and fairly, there is no way of knowing whether vox populi is really […]

by Jim Solley “I have discovered the secrets of the pyramids, and have found out how the Egyptians and the ancient builders in Peru, Yucatan, […]

BLUEPRINTS OF THE COSMOS – Page 1 of 5 by Christine Sterne ABSTRACT The causal relationship between cymatic pattern and Hindu-Yantra exposes the essential pattern […]

All things that cannot be explained remain an intriguing conversation topic for many people around the globe. Some mysteries, however, are more interesting than the rest simply because of how weird they are.


Villages in general are not strange. Villages in China are also not strange. There are many remote ones in this country, but one stands out from the others. Scientists and experts are extremely interested in the inhabitants of Yangsi, situated in the Sichuan Province. The reason? Not only are there only 80 residents in the village, but almost half of them are dwarfs.

Rumor has it, according to those who live in Yangsi, that a mysterious disease befell the little village more than 60 years ago. Young children between the ages of five and seven were most affected, and the disease caused them to simply stop growing. Experts now know that stunted growth is only likely to appear in 1 in 20,000 people, so what happened in Yangsi is something very much out of the ordinary. Especially considering that historic sightings of the dwarfs claim that several hundred of them were residing in the Sichuan region at one point .

Zipf's law ( / ˈ z ɪ f / ) is an empirical law formulated using mathematical statistics that refers to the fact that many types of data studied in the physical and social sciences can be approximated with a Zipfian distribution, one of a family of related discrete power law probability distributions . Ziph distribution is related to the zeta distribution , but is not identical.

The law is named after the American linguist George Kingsley Zipf (1902–1950), who popularized it and sought to explain it (Zipf 1935, 1949), though he did not claim to have originated it. [2] The French stenographer Jean-Baptiste Estoup (1868–1950) appears to have noticed the regularity before Zipf. [3] [ not verified in body ] It was also noted in 1913 by German physicist Felix Auerbach [4] (1856–1933).

Zipf's law is most easily observed by plotting the data on a log-log graph, with the axes being log (rank order) and log (frequency). For example, the word "the" (as described above) would appear at x = log(1), y = log(69971). It is also possible to plot reciprocal rank against frequency or reciprocal frequency or interword interval against rank. [2] The data conform to Zipf's law to the extent that the plot is linear .

The intelligent reader will judge for himself. Without examining the facts fully and fairly, there is no way of knowing whether vox populi is really […]

by Jim Solley “I have discovered the secrets of the pyramids, and have found out how the Egyptians and the ancient builders in Peru, Yucatan, […]

BLUEPRINTS OF THE COSMOS – Page 1 of 5 by Christine Sterne ABSTRACT The causal relationship between cymatic pattern and Hindu-Yantra exposes the essential pattern […]

All things that cannot be explained remain an intriguing conversation topic for many people around the globe. Some mysteries, however, are more interesting than the rest simply because of how weird they are.


Villages in general are not strange. Villages in China are also not strange. There are many remote ones in this country, but one stands out from the others. Scientists and experts are extremely interested in the inhabitants of Yangsi, situated in the Sichuan Province. The reason? Not only are there only 80 residents in the village, but almost half of them are dwarfs.

Rumor has it, according to those who live in Yangsi, that a mysterious disease befell the little village more than 60 years ago. Young children between the ages of five and seven were most affected, and the disease caused them to simply stop growing. Experts now know that stunted growth is only likely to appear in 1 in 20,000 people, so what happened in Yangsi is something very much out of the ordinary. Especially considering that historic sightings of the dwarfs claim that several hundred of them were residing in the Sichuan region at one point .

Zipf's law ( / ˈ z ɪ f / ) is an empirical law formulated using mathematical statistics that refers to the fact that many types of data studied in the physical and social sciences can be approximated with a Zipfian distribution, one of a family of related discrete power law probability distributions . Ziph distribution is related to the zeta distribution , but is not identical.

The law is named after the American linguist George Kingsley Zipf (1902–1950), who popularized it and sought to explain it (Zipf 1935, 1949), though he did not claim to have originated it. [2] The French stenographer Jean-Baptiste Estoup (1868–1950) appears to have noticed the regularity before Zipf. [3] [ not verified in body ] It was also noted in 1913 by German physicist Felix Auerbach [4] (1856–1933).

Zipf's law is most easily observed by plotting the data on a log-log graph, with the axes being log (rank order) and log (frequency). For example, the word "the" (as described above) would appear at x = log(1), y = log(69971). It is also possible to plot reciprocal rank against frequency or reciprocal frequency or interword interval against rank. [2] The data conform to Zipf's law to the extent that the plot is linear .

In this 1993 Quantum story, reporter Cathy Johnson joined researchers on their quest to unravel the mystery that is the caves beneath the Nullarbor.

Unique in the world, these are big labyrinthine salt water-filled caves, up to 90 metres below the flat, dry desert surface and extending for kilometres underground.

To find the answer, researchers had to scuba dive deep into a strange almost lifeless world, where the water is so clear, it's almost as if it is suspended in space.

The intelligent reader will judge for himself. Without examining the facts fully and fairly, there is no way of knowing whether vox populi is really […]

by Jim Solley “I have discovered the secrets of the pyramids, and have found out how the Egyptians and the ancient builders in Peru, Yucatan, […]

BLUEPRINTS OF THE COSMOS – Page 1 of 5 by Christine Sterne ABSTRACT The causal relationship between cymatic pattern and Hindu-Yantra exposes the essential pattern […]

The intelligent reader will judge for himself. Without examining the facts fully and fairly, there is no way of knowing whether vox populi is really […]

by Jim Solley “I have discovered the secrets of the pyramids, and have found out how the Egyptians and the ancient builders in Peru, Yucatan, […]

BLUEPRINTS OF THE COSMOS – Page 1 of 5 by Christine Sterne ABSTRACT The causal relationship between cymatic pattern and Hindu-Yantra exposes the essential pattern […]

All things that cannot be explained remain an intriguing conversation topic for many people around the globe. Some mysteries, however, are more interesting than the rest simply because of how weird they are.


Villages in general are not strange. Villages in China are also not strange. There are many remote ones in this country, but one stands out from the others. Scientists and experts are extremely interested in the inhabitants of Yangsi, situated in the Sichuan Province. The reason? Not only are there only 80 residents in the village, but almost half of them are dwarfs.

Rumor has it, according to those who live in Yangsi, that a mysterious disease befell the little village more than 60 years ago. Young children between the ages of five and seven were most affected, and the disease caused them to simply stop growing. Experts now know that stunted growth is only likely to appear in 1 in 20,000 people, so what happened in Yangsi is something very much out of the ordinary. Especially considering that historic sightings of the dwarfs claim that several hundred of them were residing in the Sichuan region at one point .

10 Strange Mysteries From Around The World That Are Still.


1) Which of the following contributes most to the mystery.

Posted by 2018 article

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