Subject: South Asia Studies , Anthropology (general)

Human Bondage: Tracing its Roots in India is an in-depth study of bonded labor with special focus on how the system exists in India. The book provides us with a detailed analysis of the historical, social and cultural context in which bondage has developed.

The author discusses the socio-economic characteristics that accompany bondage: caste, illiteracy, landlessness and land tenure issues, alienation of land, lack of skills, poor employment and wage conditions, indebtedness, migration, and globalization.

In the beginning of the 20th century 9-year-old Philip Carey became an orphan, and was sent for bringing up to his uncle in Blackstable. His uncle was a vicar and did not feel soft feelings toward his nephew, but in his house Philip found a lot of different books, which helped him to forget about his solitude.

In the school, where he was sent, he was mocked at because of his club foot. These mocking made him very timid and bashful, it seemed to him that suffer was his destiny. Philip begged God to make him healthy, and after it had not happened, he was the only one he blamed. He thought that his faith was not strong enough. He hated school, and there was no way he considered continuing his education at Oxford, as his uncle wanted. Philip himself wanted to study in Germany, and he managed to achieve his aim.

In Germany Philip got acquainted with Hayward and got under his influence. Hayward was talented and rather out of the common. The arguments of Hayward with other people about religion and literature left a very significant track in Philip’s soul: in one moment he understood that did not believe in God anymore, was not afraid of hell, and a human should be responsible for his deeds only before himself.

Blackstable. Small town in Kent, about sixty miles southeast of London, based upon the real town of Whitstable, where Philip goes at a young age to live with his aunt and uncle, the town vicar, after his mother dies. Life in this environment is so rigid and monotonous that Philip is forced to seek release in his uncle’s large collection of books, which sets the stage for his later desire to travel extensively.

King’s School. Public school (the British equivalent of an American private school) for boys that Philip attends in the fictional town of Tercanbury, believed to be based on a school of the same name that Maugham attended in the real town of Canterbury. The boarding school setting, typical of British schools of the time, is to Philip a place of misery, where he is first tormented about his clubfoot, a physical deformity that prevents him from participating in most athletic activities. In addition, the lack of privacy associated with a boarding school is difficult for Philip to endure, and he longs to escape.

*Heidelberg. Picturesque German city on the Rhine River in which Philip spends a year learning French and German after leaving public school. As Paris represents the art world, Heidelberg seems to Philip the seat of philosophy and intellectualism. In addition, Heidelberg represents Philip’s first chance at freedom and independence. There, much as Maugham did in real life, Philip lives in a boardinghouse with professors and students from many different countries; this setting gives him his first real opportunity to examine his religious beliefs and philosophy of life, and he ultimately concludes that he does not believe in God....

Of Human Bondage is a 1915 novel by W. Somerset Maugham . It is generally agreed to be his masterpiece and to be strongly autobiographical in nature, although Maugham stated, "This is a novel, not an autobiography, though much in it is autobiographical, more is pure invention." [1] Maugham, who had originally planned to call his novel Beauty from Ashes , finally settled on a title taken from a section of Spinoza 's Ethics . [2] The Modern Library ranked Of Human Bondage No. 66 on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century .

The book begins with the death of Helen Carey, the much beloved mother of nine-year-old Philip Carey. Philip has a club foot and his father had died a few months before. Now orphaned, he is sent to live with his aunt Louisa and uncle William Carey.

Early chapters relate Philip's experiences at his uncle's vicarage. Aunt Louisa tries to be a mother to Philip, but his uncle takes a cold disposition towards him. Philip's uncle has a vast collection of books, and Philip enjoys reading to find ways to escape his mundane existence. Less than a year later, Philip is sent to a boarding school. His uncle and aunt wish for him to eventually attend Oxford. Philip's disability and sensitive nature make it difficult for him to fit in with the other students. Philip is informed that he could have earned a scholarship for Oxford, which both his uncle and school headmaster see as a wise course, but Philip insists on going to Germany.

Subject: South Asia Studies , Anthropology (general)

Human Bondage: Tracing its Roots in India is an in-depth study of bonded labor with special focus on how the system exists in India. The book provides us with a detailed analysis of the historical, social and cultural context in which bondage has developed.

The author discusses the socio-economic characteristics that accompany bondage: caste, illiteracy, landlessness and land tenure issues, alienation of land, lack of skills, poor employment and wage conditions, indebtedness, migration, and globalization.

In the beginning of the 20th century 9-year-old Philip Carey became an orphan, and was sent for bringing up to his uncle in Blackstable. His uncle was a vicar and did not feel soft feelings toward his nephew, but in his house Philip found a lot of different books, which helped him to forget about his solitude.

In the school, where he was sent, he was mocked at because of his club foot. These mocking made him very timid and bashful, it seemed to him that suffer was his destiny. Philip begged God to make him healthy, and after it had not happened, he was the only one he blamed. He thought that his faith was not strong enough. He hated school, and there was no way he considered continuing his education at Oxford, as his uncle wanted. Philip himself wanted to study in Germany, and he managed to achieve his aim.

In Germany Philip got acquainted with Hayward and got under his influence. Hayward was talented and rather out of the common. The arguments of Hayward with other people about religion and literature left a very significant track in Philip’s soul: in one moment he understood that did not believe in God anymore, was not afraid of hell, and a human should be responsible for his deeds only before himself.

Blackstable. Small town in Kent, about sixty miles southeast of London, based upon the real town of Whitstable, where Philip goes at a young age to live with his aunt and uncle, the town vicar, after his mother dies. Life in this environment is so rigid and monotonous that Philip is forced to seek release in his uncle’s large collection of books, which sets the stage for his later desire to travel extensively.

King’s School. Public school (the British equivalent of an American private school) for boys that Philip attends in the fictional town of Tercanbury, believed to be based on a school of the same name that Maugham attended in the real town of Canterbury. The boarding school setting, typical of British schools of the time, is to Philip a place of misery, where he is first tormented about his clubfoot, a physical deformity that prevents him from participating in most athletic activities. In addition, the lack of privacy associated with a boarding school is difficult for Philip to endure, and he longs to escape.

*Heidelberg. Picturesque German city on the Rhine River in which Philip spends a year learning French and German after leaving public school. As Paris represents the art world, Heidelberg seems to Philip the seat of philosophy and intellectualism. In addition, Heidelberg represents Philip’s first chance at freedom and independence. There, much as Maugham did in real life, Philip lives in a boardinghouse with professors and students from many different countries; this setting gives him his first real opportunity to examine his religious beliefs and philosophy of life, and he ultimately concludes that he does not believe in God....

Of Human Bondage is a 1915 novel by W. Somerset Maugham . It is generally agreed to be his masterpiece and to be strongly autobiographical in nature, although Maugham stated, "This is a novel, not an autobiography, though much in it is autobiographical, more is pure invention." [1] Maugham, who had originally planned to call his novel Beauty from Ashes , finally settled on a title taken from a section of Spinoza 's Ethics . [2] The Modern Library ranked Of Human Bondage No. 66 on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century .

The book begins with the death of Helen Carey, the much beloved mother of nine-year-old Philip Carey. Philip has a club foot and his father had died a few months before. Now orphaned, he is sent to live with his aunt Louisa and uncle William Carey.

Early chapters relate Philip's experiences at his uncle's vicarage. Aunt Louisa tries to be a mother to Philip, but his uncle takes a cold disposition towards him. Philip's uncle has a vast collection of books, and Philip enjoys reading to find ways to escape his mundane existence. Less than a year later, Philip is sent to a boarding school. His uncle and aunt wish for him to eventually attend Oxford. Philip's disability and sensitive nature make it difficult for him to fit in with the other students. Philip is informed that he could have earned a scholarship for Oxford, which both his uncle and school headmaster see as a wise course, but Philip insists on going to Germany.

Of Human Bondage is a 1915 novel by W. Somerset Maugham. It is generally agreed to be his masterpiece and to be strongly autobiographical in nature, although Maugham ...

Directed by John Cromwell. With Bette Davis, Leslie Howard, Frances Dee, Kay Johnson. A young man finds himself attracted to a cold and unfeeling waitress who may ...

Of Human Bondage is a 1934 American Pre-Code drama film directed by John Cromwell and is widely regarded by critics as the film that made Bette Davis a star. The ...

Subject: South Asia Studies , Anthropology (general)

Human Bondage: Tracing its Roots in India is an in-depth study of bonded labor with special focus on how the system exists in India. The book provides us with a detailed analysis of the historical, social and cultural context in which bondage has developed.

The author discusses the socio-economic characteristics that accompany bondage: caste, illiteracy, landlessness and land tenure issues, alienation of land, lack of skills, poor employment and wage conditions, indebtedness, migration, and globalization.

In the beginning of the 20th century 9-year-old Philip Carey became an orphan, and was sent for bringing up to his uncle in Blackstable. His uncle was a vicar and did not feel soft feelings toward his nephew, but in his house Philip found a lot of different books, which helped him to forget about his solitude.

In the school, where he was sent, he was mocked at because of his club foot. These mocking made him very timid and bashful, it seemed to him that suffer was his destiny. Philip begged God to make him healthy, and after it had not happened, he was the only one he blamed. He thought that his faith was not strong enough. He hated school, and there was no way he considered continuing his education at Oxford, as his uncle wanted. Philip himself wanted to study in Germany, and he managed to achieve his aim.

In Germany Philip got acquainted with Hayward and got under his influence. Hayward was talented and rather out of the common. The arguments of Hayward with other people about religion and literature left a very significant track in Philip’s soul: in one moment he understood that did not believe in God anymore, was not afraid of hell, and a human should be responsible for his deeds only before himself.

Blackstable. Small town in Kent, about sixty miles southeast of London, based upon the real town of Whitstable, where Philip goes at a young age to live with his aunt and uncle, the town vicar, after his mother dies. Life in this environment is so rigid and monotonous that Philip is forced to seek release in his uncle’s large collection of books, which sets the stage for his later desire to travel extensively.

King’s School. Public school (the British equivalent of an American private school) for boys that Philip attends in the fictional town of Tercanbury, believed to be based on a school of the same name that Maugham attended in the real town of Canterbury. The boarding school setting, typical of British schools of the time, is to Philip a place of misery, where he is first tormented about his clubfoot, a physical deformity that prevents him from participating in most athletic activities. In addition, the lack of privacy associated with a boarding school is difficult for Philip to endure, and he longs to escape.

*Heidelberg. Picturesque German city on the Rhine River in which Philip spends a year learning French and German after leaving public school. As Paris represents the art world, Heidelberg seems to Philip the seat of philosophy and intellectualism. In addition, Heidelberg represents Philip’s first chance at freedom and independence. There, much as Maugham did in real life, Philip lives in a boardinghouse with professors and students from many different countries; this setting gives him his first real opportunity to examine his religious beliefs and philosophy of life, and he ultimately concludes that he does not believe in God....

Subject: South Asia Studies , Anthropology (general)

Human Bondage: Tracing its Roots in India is an in-depth study of bonded labor with special focus on how the system exists in India. The book provides us with a detailed analysis of the historical, social and cultural context in which bondage has developed.

The author discusses the socio-economic characteristics that accompany bondage: caste, illiteracy, landlessness and land tenure issues, alienation of land, lack of skills, poor employment and wage conditions, indebtedness, migration, and globalization.

Subject: South Asia Studies , Anthropology (general)

Human Bondage: Tracing its Roots in India is an in-depth study of bonded labor with special focus on how the system exists in India. The book provides us with a detailed analysis of the historical, social and cultural context in which bondage has developed.

The author discusses the socio-economic characteristics that accompany bondage: caste, illiteracy, landlessness and land tenure issues, alienation of land, lack of skills, poor employment and wage conditions, indebtedness, migration, and globalization.

In the beginning of the 20th century 9-year-old Philip Carey became an orphan, and was sent for bringing up to his uncle in Blackstable. His uncle was a vicar and did not feel soft feelings toward his nephew, but in his house Philip found a lot of different books, which helped him to forget about his solitude.

In the school, where he was sent, he was mocked at because of his club foot. These mocking made him very timid and bashful, it seemed to him that suffer was his destiny. Philip begged God to make him healthy, and after it had not happened, he was the only one he blamed. He thought that his faith was not strong enough. He hated school, and there was no way he considered continuing his education at Oxford, as his uncle wanted. Philip himself wanted to study in Germany, and he managed to achieve his aim.

In Germany Philip got acquainted with Hayward and got under his influence. Hayward was talented and rather out of the common. The arguments of Hayward with other people about religion and literature left a very significant track in Philip’s soul: in one moment he understood that did not believe in God anymore, was not afraid of hell, and a human should be responsible for his deeds only before himself.

Of Human Bondage (1934 film) - Wikipedia


Of Human Bondage (1934) - IMDb

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